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BPA Free – Another Con Job?

Bisphenol A, aka BPA, has been implicated as an endocrine disruptor (affecting organs like your thyroid). In response, consumers have demanded that it be removed from products they use like hard plastic bottles. Over the past few years we’ve seen lots of stickers on these products proudly announce that they are ‘BPA Free!!!’ Many out there were happy to see this change.

For anyone who has listened to my lectures recently should remember that I warned the audience that this was likely to be nothing more than a con job. Did industry remove BPA from these products? Of course they did, doing anything less would have been lying. Were they being entirely honest? Heck no. No more BPA meant using BPS and BPF both of which I said were going to be just as bad.

This week, the journal Environmental Health Perspectives released a pre-publication article saying that “Based on the current literature, BPS and BPF are as hormonally active as BPA, and have endocrine disrupting effects.” People in the plastics industry knew that these replacements for Bisphenol A were damaging to the endocrine system and if they claim they didn’t, then, frankly, they had their heads buried in the sand.

Critics of the position that toxicity from chemicals like BPA is not a major issue relating to human health are cut from the same cloth that claimed that cigarette smoking wasn’t a major cause of cancer. ‘Humans are not exposed to that much on a daily basis.’ goes the argument. Former Washington State governor, Dixie Lee Ray once said about the dangers of excessive radiation, “Everybody is exposed to radiation. A little bit more or a little bit less is of no consequence.” She even dismissed the negative health claims of the victims of the Hiroshima nuclear bomb. 

While this may seem over the top, it is the reality of what we as consumers face. Denial, delay, and slight of hand like the replacement of BPS and BPF for Bisphenol A. Instead of using BPA free plastic bottles, use glass or unlined metal containers. Your thyroid will thank you later.

Next time, I’ll continue the discussion on electrolytes and health.

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Testosterone, MI and Stroke

Late last year, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) published an article that purported that there was an increased risk of developing a myocardial infarction and stroke in men taking testosterone therapy if they had signs of coronary artery disease. The media jumped on the article and bellowed loud and long that this showed that men should not take testosterone and that doctors who use it are quacks. Problem is that the paper was deeply flawed and did not show what it claimed it did. This is sad as this error will not be picked up in the media and a lot of men’s health will be negatively affected.

So what is my support for my claim above, Dr. Eugene Shippen, MD  Medical Staff, St. Joseph Hospital, Reading, PA posted his open letter to JAMA on the FACT newsgroup at Gordon Research today. Here it is in its entirety

To the JAMA editor:

 

The article by Vigen et al has so many design flaws that the conclusions of increased risks of testosterone treatment should be questioned.(1)

1.     The most important design flaw is the choice of angiography as the primary entry variable that had NO effect on outcomes. Previous VA studies and their own current analyses demonstrate no risk differences for treated or non-treated men for cardiovascular disease mortality(2). Therefore, this variable not only had no bearing on the results directly, but it resulted in many time-related statistical complexities regarding treatment timing and event relationships.

2.     Additionally, this variable resulted in substantial exclusions that would have significantly increased the cohort numbers and important comparative results. For example, 2798 were excluded because testosterone treatment was started before angiography.

3.     If the actual deaths in the treated (67/1223 – 5-5%) and untreated cohorts (681/7486 – 9.1%) are simply analyzed, there is an amazingly similar reduction in actual death rates of 39.6% (5.5/9.1%) in the treated cohort. This is dramatically similar to the 39% reduction in overall mortality in testosterone treated men at VA facilities reported by Shore et al (2). The complexities of statistical analysis due to time and treatment variables reverses this clear mathematical data. How can this dramatic reversal to a 30% INCREASE occur when the RAW actual data say the opposite occurred! That is a 70% difference between actual and analyzed (manipulated) statistics?

4.     A serious flaw regards the time of testosterone treatment and relationship to event outcomes. For example, 1 in 6 of treated men filled only one prescription, yet these men were entered into the treatment cohort for the duration of the study. Duration of treatment or the time between treatments and endpoints is not clearly reported. It would be difficult, for example, to relate treatment for 1-3 months to an event 2-3 years later.

5.     Testosterone testing post-treatment was available for only 60% of the treatment cohort and was reported as 332.2 ng/dl for the “first repeat testosterone measurement”. This low value suggests poor compliance with any of the treatments. Where are the testing data for any additional tests over the treatment periods? There is poor treatment data for 60% and NO reliable data to corroborate adequate treatment for 40% of the cohort. Who can rely on the published conclusions?

References:

1. Vigen R, et al. Association of testosterone therapy with mortality, myocardial infarction, and stroke in men with low testosterone levels.JAMA. 2013 Nov 6;310(17):1829-36.

2. Shores MM, et al. Testosterone treatment and mortality in men with low testosterone levels. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 June;97(6):2050-8.

Hope you can share this and tell others the truth.

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TahoeFest 2013 Price Lowered

We’ve listened to you and decided to lower the price for TahoeFest 2013 to $495. Also, we are offering scholarships and discounts to anyone who needs them just as my mentor Robert Crayhon had done with his Boulderfest conferences. It is my sincere wish that everyone has the opportunity to come to this conference and learn from the phenomenal speakers we have lined up for you. I also don’t want cost to hold anyone back.

The tools that will be taught to the attendees are the kind that will have a large impact on the health and well being of countless people which is why I so want to get as many people to TahoeFest as possible. Not only that, but the venue is one of the most beautiful in the world. To sign up, call 775-851-3337 or go to the Knowledge Through Solutions website.

 

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New Speakers for TahoeFest 2013

Lake Tahoe Hyatt

Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe

Just wanted to announce some new speakers for TahoeFest 2013. The first is Dr. Thomas O’Bryan, D.C. whose topic will be “Differentiating Tools for Gluten Sensitivity and Celiac Disease: In-Office and Laboratory Assessments.” He will review this new-kid-on-the (science)-blocknon-celiac gluten sensitivity, how to identify it, and more importantly how to treat it.

The next addition is Dr. Rachel Fresco, L.Ac., PhD. developer of Biocidin, one of my favorite herbal products on the market. I’m sure anyone who has attended any of my seminars will be familiar with the product for its many uses as nutritional support associated with intestinal ecology, systemic wellness and detoxification. Her talk will be on how to use the botanical combinations she has developed to help your clients achieve optimal health.

I also want to stress what the theme of TahoeFest 2013 is – Practical Tools For Your Clinical Practice. When I mean practical tools I mean things you can use right away to help improve your clients health as well as improving your practice whether as a physical trainer, naturopath, chiropractor, MD, DO or clinical nutritionist. Everyone will benefit from this seminar, especially your client.

To register, click on this link. Hope to see you at TahoeFest 2013!!!

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Amino Acid Testing – #5

Today’s blog is the first in a five part series to uncover what I believe are the best tests to help increase fat loss, improve muscle production and achieve optimal health faster. I’m sure there will be disagreements and differing opinions, but I come at this from experience. Over the past 27 years, I’ve seen over 60,000 lab tests and feel that these tests really make a difference.

Today’s blog is an overview of what I feel is optimal to achieve maximum results. It would be impossible short of a 400-500 page book (it’s in the works) to give you all the information I’ve learned over the years. But, if you come to one of my classes (Sydney and Melbourne, Australia in February, Lake Tahoe at the end of April) I guarantee you will walk out with more immediately usable information than any class you will take.

#5 – Plasma Amino Acids

As many of you know, amino acids are the building blocks of hormones, muscle, collagen, neurotransmitters and so much more. They are every personal trainer’s best friend and are essential to good health. The problem lies in the quality of protein that most of us get in our diet and the co-factors that allow the amino acids we take in to be processed and metabolized properly.

Imbalances in amino acid composition are an issue I see all the time, regardless of the fitness of the individual. Over the years I dealt with world class athletes, weekend warriors, generally fit people and the full spectrum of the chronically ill and I have seen only a handful with truly balanced amino acid profiles. Having a properly balanced amino acid profile is not that hard to achieve but you have to know what it looks like to get maximum benefits.

People trying to get fit or maximize fat loss can gain a lot from a plasma amino acid profile. Here are some examples. In order to improve fat metabolism, you need adequate taurine. To build muscle you need the branch-chain amino acids (BCAA’s), leucine, isoleucine and valine. But there is a problem with branch-chains that I’ve seen over the years especially with highly fit individuals. Many of them have elevated BCAA’s which indicates a lack of proper metabolism.

Without giving away the farm information wise (you’ll have to come to my classes for that) here one issue with high levels of the BCAA’s is that they may cause a blockade at the site of the blood brain barrier and can interfere with the ability of tryptophan to enter into the brain which can cause a problem with serotonin metabolism and other tryptophan related pathways. In my classes, I review case studies with high BCAA’s in plasma and how to get them to metabolize properly. I also make the case why I recommend plasma or bloodspot testing over urinary amino acids.

Other amino acids that can make a huge difference in fat loss and improved health include glycine (a potent detoxifier), arginine (helps improve circulation) and lysine and methionine (helps to create carnitine which is essential in fat metabolism). Deficiencies in any of these can hinder your bodies ability to metabolize fat properly. Excesses can point out nutrient deficiencies in a biochemically individualized manner.

This is just a scratching of the surface of everything you can get out of an amino acid panel. The amount of information available is enormous. Because no one can hope to remember every nuance, I developed the Lab Assist™ Report which provides all the information possible to interpret the results in an easy to understand and easy to use format.

Tomorrow lab test #4.

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Dr. Dean Raffelock DC, CCN, DIPL, AC, DIBAK – Nutrition for Pregnancy, Neurotransmitter and Adrenal Hormone Balance

In this interview from September, 2002, Robert Crayhon talks to Dr. Dean Raffelock about nutrition for pregnancy, neurotransmitter and adrenal hormone balance.  Thanks to Complementary Prescriptions for the use of this recording.

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NMU-2002-09-Dean Raffelock DC, CCN, DIPL, AC, DIBAK – Nutrition for Pregnancy, Neurotransmitter and Adrenal Hormone Balance
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Amino Acids – We Need A Balance of Them

Amino acids are the building blocks of life. It is what also makes up proteins. Many plants that we eat contain amino acids but our main sources of complete proteins (containing all the essential amino acids) come from meat and fish along with eggs and some dairy. Each food has a different amino acid make up. Because of this, we need to eat a wide variety of foods so we can get a balance of the essential amino acids we need to maintain good health. Why this is so will become apparent as you read on.

Science has shown us that there are nine essential amino acids that we cannot make so we must get them from our diets. They are – Histidine, Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Threonine, Tryptophan and Valine. Children though have a few more essential amino acids as their systems don’t make them efficiently yet. These are – Arginine, Cysteine, Taurine and Tyrosine. Having enough of each of these amino acids makes it possible to build other amino acids and more complex proteins like collagen.

Collagen is abundant in bones giving it flexibility. It is also found in skin, muscle, tendons, eyes, blood vessels, the gut and between your disks in your spine. All your hormones and neurotransmitters require proteins. For proper thyroid function you need tyrosine, your brain needs glutamic acid and GABA in proper balance, and the list goes on and on. Of course, your DNA and RNA, the genetic instructions that allow for life are made of specific amino acids. As you can see, you need amino acids to survive.

One of the most disturbing aspects of today’s Western diets is how few foods we tend to eat. The typical American for instance only eats about 8 to 10 foods. What does this have to do with amino acids? Plenty! The old adage that we are what we eat should be apparent here. If we eat just a few different foods we will be getting a narrow band of amino acids. Some will be more than we need and some we won’t get enough of. If we continue this way year in and year out, we won’t be able to make some hormones or neurotransmitters or we’ll make less of them than we need to stay healthy.

To top things off, the foods we eat today, are different than what we’ve been eating for millennium. Cattle, chickens and pigs eat grains that they never ate before and that changes their amino acid make up. Grass fed beef for instance has a very different amino acid makeup than what you would find in grain feed beef. I believe that many of the health issues we face today are because of the changes in the amino acid makeup of our foods.

So how do we reverse this trend? Supplementation with a balanced amino acid blend. There are a few ways to go. One would be a cold processed whey protein shake like the one Dr. John Young has. Or you can try the amino acid complex I developed called Synerplex. Synerplex uses a collagen based blend derived from chicken bone marrow. But neither can overcome a bad and narrow diet. You need to eat more naturally fed or organically grown foods to stay healthy.

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